Alberta's Best Garden Blog

Mint 101

One of my personal favourites, mint is one of the most versatile herbs out there. Whether you’re going for a sweet or savoury dish, a crisp refreshing cocktail, or a warm mug full of soothing herbal tea, mint adds a just the zing you need for both flavour and fragrance. Mint is making a comeback in a huge way, not just in cooking, but in design too!

mint

Mint Colour Theory

The colour mint goes with nearly everything. We’re talking true mint, not the bright turquoise shade commonly associated with Tiffany’s. True mint is a soft, muted green-grey shade that has all the benefits of a neutral tone, yet it’s anything but bland. Green is crisp and revitalizing, but the hint of metallic grey gives it a contemporary feel, fusing plant life and nature with science and technology.

Mint is also growing in popularity because of its classification as a gender-neutral shade. Some folks aren’t into the ultra-feminine hues and you certainly see a lot of those in gardening, so mint green is a great option if gender-neutral tones are the goal.

A garden that has a mix of clean, mint green tones will complement whatever paint colours are featured in your home, blending seamlessly while adding a fresh, updated feel. You might assume a garden comprised of mainly green tones would be unexciting and conventional, but with the cool, silver undertones, it really adds that “wow” factor.

mint garden

Growing Mint in Your Flower Bed

Obviously, if you’re going to have a mint-themed garden, the first plant you should consider adding to the mix is – you guessed it – mint. Kind of a no-brainer there! This popular herb has an endless variety of uses (seriously, is there anything this plant doesn’t do?) plus it’s pretty easy to cultivate.

Mint is a perennial that likes partial sunlight with a bit of shade. So long as the soil is light with good drainage and watered regularly, your mint will be happy. It’s a speedy grower, and you’ll get a few chances to harvest it throughout the growing season, either by picking leaves off when you need them or cutting off the entire plant, leaving a stem about 1.5 inches tall.

Here’s a list of some of the many uses of this fragrant flowering herb:

Mint is a tasty addition to drinks, both hot and cold. Peppermint tea? Heck yes. Pineapple mint mojitos and cucumber mint gin sodas? Double yes.

It’s a versatile flavour in loads of exotic dishes. Vietnamese salad rolls, Thai green curries, and Mediterranean garlic yoghurt sauces all feature mint as the stand-out star.

It’s a nice palette cleanser. In places like Syria and other Middle Eastern countries, big bushels of fresh mint are served on platters, to nibble on between mouthfuls of flavourful, spicy meat and rice dishes.

It’s a wildly popular plant among pollinators. Bees, butterflies and other winged insects that pollinate our flowers are much more likely to frequent your garden if it’s full of this aromatic herb.

Yet, it’s not so popular among the unwanted pests. Biting insects and unwanted plant-munchers aren’t so fond of this fragrant herb. Mosquitoes, flies, ants, and even animals, like mice and deer, are repelled by mint.

It’s great for your gut. Mint improves digestion, helps balance gut flora, and freshens your breath.   
Plus, it’s good for the head and the heart, too. Mint has been shown to improve mental awareness and increase heart vitality.

Mint-Toned Foliage and Flowers to Plant in Spring   
Pictured Above: Dusty Miller, Artemisia, Echeveria

Mint-Toned Foliage and Flowers to Plant in Spring   

If you’re thinking of going for a crisp, green-grey colour scheme with your garden, here’s a list of other plants you can include in your mint green garden:

Eucalyptus: If you’ve been keeping up with Chip and Joanna Gaines and their spectacular home designs, you’ve probably noticed their recent love of eucalyptus. Simple, green wreaths made from eucalyptus are stunning additions to bare walls and doors, and a few strategically-placed sprigs throughout the home make a big statement.  

Echeveria Succulents: These waxy-leafed spiralling plants are all the rage right now. Images of echeveria are popping up in textiles and art pieces everywhere you look. They’re that pretty!

Dusty Miller: This fuzzy, silver-green plant has such a peculiar yet pretty shape– it kind of looks like it belongs in a coral reef. Dusty miller’s lighter metallic tones really amp up the cool tones in your flower garden colour palette.  

Blue Spruce Sedum: This popular variety of ground cover plant has a subtle, blue-green tint that makes it look kind of like spruce needles. Keep in mind, a pop of colour will briefly appear in June with this one when bright pink stems emerge from the foliage and lemon-yellow blossoms sit on top.

Artemisia: Many gardeners choose this shrub for their flower garden designs, as its soft, silvery-green foliage helps balance any colour palette, especially to break up two bolder contrasting colours. Adding it in the mix for your mint-toned garden will create a streamlined look that’s trendy and modern.

Whether you’re growing the herb to spice up your life, or simply taking the colour inspiration into your home, this year’s mint trend is hard to beat. To grab your own herb or mint-hued plant today, stop by the greenhouse today!


Print Friendly, PDF & Email