A Minimalist’s Guide To Houseplants

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Whether you’re a diehard minimalist who’s considering making room for some plants in the house, or if you’re a recovering packrat desperately trying to Marie Kondo the crap out of your living space, this minimalism houseplant guide is worth giving a read! 

Mastering the art of minimalism doesn’t come naturally to everyone, but when you pull it off well, the results are so satisfying. Decorate your minimalist rooms with these low-key houseplants for Edmonton homes. They’re somehow understated, yet just bold enough to perfectly complement that sleek, modern aesthetic that’s been taking over home decor magazines and Instagram feeds everywhere.

Minimalist Living Room Plants

The minimalism mantra is “Less is More,” so the key is to avoid overdoing it. One large statement houseplant or a few small houseplants placed strategically throughout the room will make a significant impact on a clutter-free room. For your main living area, these options should satisfy your need for greenery, while still maintaining that satisfying simplicity. 

One Large Monstera: Instead of grabbing attention with brightly coloured flowers or a messy mop of foliage, the Monstera makes a statement with its broad, glossy green leaves full of holes and cutouts like a piece of Swiss cheese. Solid-coloured varieties with no stripes or variegation in the foliage make great pieces for a minimal aesthetic because they’ll pop up against flatter, neutral shades without looking too flashy. When they’re near a light source, the hole-filled leaves can cast some interesting, soft shadows on the walls — it’s all about those little details!  

A Few Small Assorted Succulents: These tiny, trendy houseplants are famous for their unique growth patterns and plump foliage. A small, swirly Echeveria; a similarly petite, pointy Haworthia; even a slightly larger Jade plant will add just enough green to your living space while still providing some variety and visual interest. Place small potted succulents on bookshelves, end tables, mantles—the list goes on. They’re super versatile, so you won’t have any trouble finding a spot to display them.

Minimalist Bedroom Plants

Often, our bedrooms don’t have quite as much light coming in from the windows compared to our kitchens and living rooms, so it’s better to opt for houseplants that don’t need a ton of sunlight. If you love closing the curtains so you can sleep in later, but don’t want your houseplants to bite the dust because of your hibernation habits, try some of these shade-tolerant options:

a minimalists guide to houseplants bedroom snake plant

One Big Snake Plant In The Corner: This large succulent has tall, slightly wavy leaves that grow straight upward, sometimes up to a few feet high. Something about the streamlined leaf growth and tall, slim shape makes it a fantastic piece to put in the corner, almost as though it was a statue. In the spirit of minimalism, this popular houseplant requires minimal upkeep and can go weeks at a time without being watered.

Small Spider Plants In Concrete Cups: The solid grey, matte finish of concrete cup planters are so on-trend. When spider plants are mature, they frequently reproduce little baby plants that can be plucked off and grown into new plants, so the small concrete containers are the perfect size for planting those little guys. Plus, they’re great for purifying the air and filtering out dust, so if you have old carpeting in your room, these will help significantly. 

Subtle Plants For The Kitchen

Minimalism de-emphasizes frivolity and unnecessary embellishments, so the more functional your decor is, the better. I love growing edible houseplants in the kitchen that are still aesthetically simple and attractive, so they jive with the chill, low-key surroundings. Try planting these edible herbs in your kitchen:

a minimalists guide to houseplants kitchen garden windowsill

One Large Potted Rosemary: This delicious, fragrant herb has an endless list of uses, and has small, needle-like foliage that grows upward in clustered stalks. Sometimes they kind of look like mini conifers, adding a fresh feel that’s distinct and unique without being too showy. Place it in a simple, solid-coloured pot and arrange it in a spot that gets a reasonable amount of sunlight.

An Assorted Mini Herb Garden Window Grid: If you want to avoid cluttering your counter up with items (which, I know, seems nearly impossible to avoid in the kitchen), you can install a hanging herb planter in your window that arranges several small herbs in a grid formation. The grid keeps them all aligned in that perfectly balanced way that may or may not give you goosebumps, depending on how much of a design geek you are. Fill your mini herb garden with treats like cilantro, basil, mint, thyme, dill, parsley, or chives, so you can snip them and sprinkle them into your recipes to your heart’s content.

Want to add a few subtle botanical accents to your living space? Swing by Salisbury Greenhouse, and we’ll help you find something that will help you achieve that effortlessly cool, simple style with your houseplants. 

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